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Latvia map stamps - types

In February 1971 Andrejs Petrevics [† 1981] defined map stamp types as Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, III, and IV in the Latvian Collector [issue 19, pp.143-7]. The type describes the style of map on the back of the stamp. Barefoot used these same type names, but with only type II instead of IIa and IIb. This list adds a type V for map margin inscriptions, which are over 10% of map stamps. Although some catalogues give a higher value to stamps from map margins, these stamps are generally less sought after.
   Type I stamps show black maps and brown lines, either thin brown topographic lines (Type Ia) or fuzzy brown contour lines (Type Ib). Type II are black maps with less precise detail than type I and larger placename letters. Type II maps are earlier than Type I, often later redrawn as Type I maps. Type III stamps have no printing on their backs, usually because they were the outside borders of maps, which were not printed. Type IV stamps show sea soundings on coastal areas. Type V stamps show text and lines on inscriptions outside the map margins.

Type Ia, thin brown topographic lines
- about 54% of map stamps.

Brown topographic lines show altitude. Where a topographic line meets the map margin, brown numerals show the height in meters. Placename texts are horizontal. The names of large places are up to 2.5mm high with upright letters. The names of smaller places are up to 1.5mm high and slant right. Closely-spaced circular symbols represent deciduous trees.

K19 Retowo, block of 8, type Ia, lower right corner, printed [Druck] 1914; show-through from RIGA / LATWIJA CDS, December 1918.

K16 Pikiele, block of 6, type Ia.

Type Ib, fuzzy brown shading on slopes
- about 14% of map stamps.

Fuzzy brown lines show slopes. Like Type Ia, place name texts are horizontal, the names of large places are usually up to 2.5mm high with upright letters, the names of smaller places are usually up to 1.5mm high and slant right, and closely-spaced circular symbols represent deciduous trees.

R14 Erlaa, two singles, type Ib.

S15 Kreuzburg [Latvian Krustpils], block of 4, type Ib, from the centre top, showing map S14 as the area directly north.

Type IIa, coarser black map, larger lettering
- about 8% of map stamps.

Much less clear than types Ia and Ib. Placenames slope down to the right with large letters, up to 5mm high. Black hatching on slopes.
   For maps are known in both type II and type I versions, type I are more recent and clearer. Most stamps were printed on only one version of a particular map. Two exceptions are stamps printed on both type II and type I versions of maps S18 Illukßst and R18 Rakischki.

Q18 Kupischki, block of 4 and single, type IIa.

R19 Uschpol, block of 4 and single, type IIa.

Type IIb, finer black map, smaller lettering
- about 1% of map stamps.

More clear than type IIa. Like type Ia, placenames slope down to the right with large letters, up to 5mm high, and there is black hatching on slopes. Type IIa are known only on maps K18 [lower right] and L18 [left].

K18 Telsze, 3 singles, type IIb. The left two stamps have a circular Cyrillic Riga cancel of 18 12 18.

L18 Łukniki, 4 singles, type IIb.

Type III, from unprinted “white” map areas
- about 11% of map stamps.

Most map sheets had areas outside the margins with no printing. There was also no printing on some sea areas, such as on map O13 Dünamünde.

N14 Schlok [Latvian Sloka], block of 4 from lower left of map showing 2 type III stamps, with no printing.

Horizontal pairs of type III stamps are uncommon.

Type IV, Sea areas with soundings in black
- less than 1% of map stamps.

Stamps with sea soundings appear only on maps H16 and H17, which show the Baltic Sea coast.

Map H17 Dorbiany, strip of 4 with sea soundings on left; single with sea sounding.

Type V, Marginal markings and legends
- about 11% of map stamps.

Map H17 Dorbiany, strip of 7 from beneath bottom left margin.

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Updated Fri, 2010-02-05 .
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